Minimalistic Text Android Widget

This is just a quick update on a widget I made for my own use using

Minimalistic Text

Tasker

Google Maps Directions API

The time, day of week, and weather information are all built into the Minimialistic Text program. Transit information was a little bit more complex.
screenshot_20161026-215751minimalistic-text-widg

The Transit information circled is two API calls to the Google maps directions API through Tasker, one for my trip to from the train station to my work bus stop and one for my trip home. They run every 5 minutes and extract out variables including the bus number, the time of departure, the train name and it’s time of departure, the length of the trip and the time when I will arrive home from the XML response to the API call.

Tasker pulls the full result from train station to work bus stop, and caches it in a variable. I then use tasker to pull each variable out of the XML results cached in the full variable.

Then, using Tasker, I format the variables into a easy-to-read (for me) one glance information screen with emoji’s to indicate bus trips, train trips, total time and icons for home and work.

Some of the additional features I’ve built into this include

  1. A widget that speaks my commute when pressed.
  2. A popup that lists out departure times for my commute
  3. I added the api call and variable update feature for this widget into my 5 minute data widget  which turns my data plan on for 5 minutes.

What I end up with is a very simple, one-glance tool that gives me all the information I need to know for my commute.

Advanced Information Management for Job Searching

This post is a collection of tools and a workflow I used for my latest job search.

Sources

My job search was focused on the Greater Toronto Area.

Indeed.ca – is a job search tool. It has it’s good points and it’s bad points but the best part of Indeed is… RSS feeds!

My Indeed.ca feeds were searches for –

  • Every college and university in the GTA as the ‘Employer’
  • Librarian
  • Knowledge Management
  • Document Management
  • Records Management
  • Instructional Designer

INALJ.com Ontario Great job aggregator tool, but no RSS feeds.

University of Toronto iSchool Job Board – Great job aggregator tool, and it has an RSS feed

The Partnership Job Board

Code4Lib Job Board

McGill SIS Job Listserv

IFLA LibJobs Listserv

Tools

Feedly

Instapaper

Google Documents

LinkedIn

Page2RSS

Feed43

Zapier

Gmail

 

Setup

At CNA-Q, I’ve been operating under contract-based employment for all six years I’ve been here, so I’ve kept my ear to the ground about jobs in Canada. I signed up for the McGill SIS Jobs Board early on, and I push all of those emails into a folder in my Gmail labelled ‘Job Listings’.

As I started actively planning for my move from CNAQ, I went to Indeed and set up all of my RSS feeds for jobs. I knew that I was looking for an academic library job, so I set up alerts for every college and university in the Toronto area. I then created general searches for

  • Librarian
  • Knowledge Management
  • Document Management
  • Records Management
  • Instructional Designer

I put all of these searches in to my RSS reader. I like Feedly, and use it to monitor a lot of news and library blogs. I added all of these searches into a folder called ‘Job Search’

The U of T job board has an excellent RSS feed, so it was added to Feedly too.

I knew of INLJ, but it has a frustrating interface. More importantly, it has no RSS feeds. I started using the Page2RSS service to grab daily changes to the INLJ Ontario page, but that got annoying after a while and I started looking for an option that would allow me to identify individual jobs that are posted. At this point, I came across Feed43. Feed43 setup is a little beyond the scope of this post, but it allows you to identify sections of repeating HTML on any webpage and turn that into a properly formatted RSS feed.

I keep both the individual job Feed43 feed and the Page2RSS feed live in Feedly.

I then subscribed by email to the IFLA job board, the Partnership job board and the Code4Lib Job Board

This put me in a situation where I was checking two locations. I’m always on Feedly, but I don’t check my email as often. I went looking for a tool to turn Email into an RSS feed and I found Zapier. If you’re familiar with IFTTT, then you grasp the basic idea of Zapier.  Zapier provides you with a very simple graphical way to connect services that wouldn’t otherwise talk to each other. Zapier allowed me to create an RSS feed for my Gmail jobs folder. That feed was plugged into Feedly.

Workflow

Every morning, I’d read through the postings from all of these RSS feeds on Feedly. I’d make very quick decisions on whether to look further at a job, and skipped the majority of the posts that came up.

When I decided to look closer at a job posting, I’d open it up and read the post briefly. If it looked reasonable and matched my skill set I saved it to Instapaper using the share function on my iPad or the plugin in Chrome, depending on where I was reading it.

Once a day, after work was over, I’d review the selection of jobs I saved to Instapaper. Using this method, I found myself finding between 2-5 reasonable jobs per week that matched my skill set and experience. I applied for about 95% of the jobs I saved to Instapaper. I often printed these out and highlighted key words in each job application

Writing Cover Letters

 The University of Toronto has a standard job application format where you email a single file containing a cover letter, resume and references. While each institution  has their own standards for how to receive documents, the University of Toronto standard application format has some real benefits to the job applicant.

  • It keeps your customization within a single document.
  • It provides a way to collect information in one place if there are any special requirements
  • It limits the number of files you have to look at

I do all of my word processing in Google Docs. The U of T format allowed me to have application ‘packages’. If the potential employer was using a particularly stringent format, I could print single pages to PDF and then upload them into the individual Applicant Tracking Systems.

The standard advice for job hunting is to customize your application for every employer. That is wise advice, but if you try to write each application from scratch, you will find yourself without any other time (even at 2-5 applications per week).

I started by very carefully applying for jobs, and re-writing my application for each position. I then approached some very wise friends, including someone who works as a recruiter and a friend at the University of Toronto. These people helped me refine my resume and cover letter to something short, effective and well developed.

After I had a ‘template’ for my cover letters down with input from working librarians and my recruiter friend, I started customizing my letters slightly less. I would start with a previously-written application package for a similar position, then customized each cover letter and resume based on keywords.

Here are some of the things I did to minimize errors.

  • I only used the name of the institution and the name of the job position in the first line of the application package
  • I read through the completed cover letter forward, then backwards
  • I minimized customization to my resume to only ‘critical’ requirements for the job. ‘Optional’ requirements were covered in my cover letter.

Any extra documentation, like salary requirements were placed on sheets after the completed ‘package’. I could tell with a glance if the application package had this extra documentation because it was more than 4 pages.

Please contact me @brettlwilliams if you’d like to see examples of my application “package” format, or if you would like to use the RSS feeds I created for INLJ Ontario.

 

 

 

 

ISBN Title Lookup Google Doc Spreadsheet

We needed to do a quick inventory of some discarded books, and while we could pull the majority of the information from our catalog, we have some donations and other books we had no quick method of getting title data.

We’ll scan the barcodes in using a barcode scanner

This uses the ISBNdb API and a quick bit of importXML

There is a 25 ISBN/day limit on this API key for testing. Google limits importXML to 50/sheet. Please get your own ISBNdb account to implement this.

https://isbndb.com/

Here’s the bit of code for the spreadsheet. Copy the example here

=importXML( concatenate( "http://isbndb.com/api/v2/xml/EV31C4LJ/books?q=", A2), "//title")

=importXML( – grabs the XML response from the ISBNdb API

concatenate( – assembles the API call URL

http://isbndb.com/api/v2/xml/EV31C4LJ/books?q= – initial APIcall string. Specifies v2 API, XML response, key and the source we’re pulling from (books)

A2 – The cell from which we’re pulling the ISBN from

“//title” – The section of the XML response that we want to put in the cell, in this case the title of the book.

Alpha Release: An EZProxy Bookmarklet

When at a journal or ebook, this bookmarklet will create a proxied link in a highlighted, popover window that you can add to a bookmark or link. The first link is a standard link that can be dragged to the desktop or bookmark bar in Windows or Mac computers. Android supports bookmarking to the homescreen The textarea contains the full link, making it much easier to create proxied bookmarks in Mobile Safari.

5-16-2013 8-35-27 AM

This project is based on the generic server-side Javascript bookmarklet described here

If you would like to try out my custom bookmarklet go here and drag the bookmarklet to your toolbar.

Here’s the bookmarklet code

javascript:javascript:var i,s,ss=['https://googledrive.com/host/0Bz8u5aAPKuh1cVZYTDZOSG41ZlE/ebk_srvrside2.js','http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.5.1/jquery.min.js'];for(i=0;i!=ss.length;i++){s=document.createElement('script');s.src=ss[i];document.body.appendChild(s);}void(0);

You can take a look at the server-side javascript hosted in my Google Drive

Link to Javascript

To try it out with your institution’s proxy server, download the code here, and just replace the var proxyURL = ""; with your institutions proxy URL.

Here are some of my development plans for this bookmarklet.

1) Better CSS styling, both more consistent cross-browser and better look & feel
2) Streamlining the javascript (It’s currently very, very clumsy)
3) Cleaning up the whitelisting
4) Re-writing URL’s that have been proxied by Hostname and/or by Port to create a link that will work under any circumstances.

Creative Commons License
Early Beta: An EZProxy Bookmarklet by Brett Williams is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License.

eBook Distribution – Experiment 1

I’ve been experimenting with some different methods of distributing ebooks using existing infrastructure. These experiments are localized (thinking of the library as a place where people go) while at the same time using WiFi, networks, computers, web servers and other tools of the internet.

My first bare-bones experiment is using Mongoose

Mongoose is a radically simple webserver. Download the executable, put it in the folder you want to share, run it and you can access it at http://localhost:8080 or at http://%5BcomputerIP%5D:8080.

If you want to run it off of port 80, or add additional functions, you can edit the optional mongoose.conf file

With a small edit of the mongoose.conf file, enabling directory listing, you can serve up a folder over a network, allowing users to download whatever is inside that folder.

Here’s some advantages

1) This is a 2 minute project.You have a folder to share, and a way to share it.

2) This method respects your user’s privacy. With a quick setup like this, you’re not harvesting their usernames, reading preferences or creating advertising profiles.

3) You can set this system up anywhere, using almost any hardware from the last 10 years.

 

Disadvantages

1) It’s ugly. You get a basic directory listing with limited functionality.

2) It violates the concept that most people have of the internet. The URL doesn’t end in .com or another top level domain, and unless you link to it, n0 one will ever know it exists.

3) While the Mongoose webserver is fairly secure, this should be run on a computer isolated from your regular network.  I secured mine by limiting access only to the 192.168.* addresses provided within my test network, it’s also running on a test server outside the regular network I usually work on.

I’ll talk about more attractive methods of serving up eBooks in my next post.

 

 

Google Reader to WordPress

Most of my reading is now done through Google Reader (well, Google Reader + Byline with a side of Instapaper) I’m trying (NaNoBloMo was a bit of a failure) to post more often and I often find that I don’t make the connection between ‘I should blog that’ and actually doing so.

I was excited to discover this blog post on how to use the Google Reader ‘Send to’ function to send links from Google Reader to your own WordPress blog.

The genius here is the URL pattern.

http://www.YOURDOMAINHERE.com/wp-admin/press-this.php?u=$url&t=$title&s=$source&v=2

I’ve added both my personal blog and the CNAQ Library Technology blog to my Google Reader for quick posting.

Via Thingelstad

Free Technology for Teachers: Virtual Cell Animations

CNA-Q is an institution that spends a lot of time and effort on ESL instruction.  Visuals are a huge help in the classroom for increasing comprehension among all students. These cell animations  from North Dakota State University are very well put together and cover a wide range of biological processes.

Free Technology for Teachers: Virtual Cell Animations.